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The question is; how do reactive forces triumph? That is to say: when they get the better of active forces do reactive forces themselves also become dominant, aggressive and subjugating? Do they, by getting together, form a greater force that would then be active? Nietzsche’s answer is that even by getting together reactive forces do not form a greater force, one that would be active. They proceed in an entirely different way — they decompose; they separate active force from what it can do; they take away a part or almost all of its power. In this way reactive forces do not become active but, on the contrary, they make active forces join them and become reactive in a new sense. We can see that, from its beginning and in developing itself, the concept of reaction changes in signification: an active force becomes reactive (in a new sense) when reactive forces (in the first sense) separate it from what it can do…Nietzsche devotes a whole book to the analysis of the figures of reactive triumph in the human world — ressentiment, bad conscience and the ascetic ideal. In each case he shows that reactive forces do not triumph by forming a superior force but by ‘separating’ active force (cf. the three essays of the GM). In each case this separation rests on a fiction, on a mystification or a falsification. It is the will to nothingness which develops the negative and inverted image and makes the subtraction. Now, there is always something imaginary in the operation of subtraction — as the negative utilisation of number shows. Thus if we want to give a numerical transcription of the victory of reactive forces we must not appeal to an addition by which reactive forces would, by getting together, become stronger than active force, but rather to a subtraction which separates active force from what it can do and denies its difference in order to make it a reactive force. Thus getting the better of action is not enough to stop reaction being reaction; on the contrary. Active force is separated from what it can do by a fiction but is not therefore any less ‘really’ reactive, in fact, this is the way in which it becomes really reactive.
Gilles Deleuze, Nietzsche and Philosophy pg. 57

Filed under deleuze nietzsche nietzsche and philosophy ressentiment bad conscience reactive forces potential potentiality potentialities difference fiction active forces genealogy of morals biopolitics administration of life negation

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It is no more than moral prejudice that truth is worth more than mere appearance; it is even the worst proved assumption there is in the world. Let at least this much be admitted: there would be no life at all if not on the basis of perspective estimates and appearances; and if, with the virtuous enthusiasm and clumsiness of some philosophers, one wanted to abolish the ‘apparent world’ altogether—well, supposing you could do that, at least nothing would be left of your ‘truth’ either. Indeed, what forces us at all to suppose that there is an essential opposition of ‘true’ and ‘false’? Is it not sufficient to assume degrees of apparentness and, as it were, lighter and darker shadows and shades of appearance—different ‘values,’ to use the language of painters? Why couldn’t the world that concerns us—be a fiction? And if somebody asked, ‘but to a fiction there surely belongs an author?’—couldn’t one answer simply: why? Doesn’t this ‘belongs’ perhaps belong to the fiction, too? Is it not permitted to be a bit ironical about the subject no less than the predicate and object? Shouldn’t philosophers be permitted to rise above faith in grammar? All due respect to governesses—but hasn’t the time come for philosophy to renounce the faith of governesses?
Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future pg. 46-47

Filed under nietzsche beyond good and evil truth prejudice philosophy philosophers value values morals fiction apollonian apollonian will illusion grammar life apparant world Platonic ideals essences essentialism

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To say that Nietzsche had a dislike for the nation-state would be a gross understatement. ‘Fatherlandishness’ is irrational ‘soil addiction’. In Thus Spoke Zarathustra, he refers to the state as ‘the coldest of all cold monsters.’ It is the ‘New Idol,’ now that god has died. Nationalism is a swindle, perpetrated by politicians. It is ‘insanity.’ Perhaps, most importantly, Nietzsche claims that nationalism is a ‘fiction,’ something that has been made.
Andrew M. Koch, “Dionysian Politics: The Anarchistic Implications of Friedrich Nietzsche’s Critique of Western Epistemology” from I Am Not A Man, I Am Dynamite!: Friedrich Nietzsche and the Anarchist Tradition pg. 58

Filed under Nietzsche anarchism the State nation-state Andrew M Koch politicians lies fiction insanity anarchy

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filling Station #55: The Northern BC Issue

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The first issue of filling Station for 2013 is hot off  the presses and will be launching February 8th. We’re very, very excited about this issue and think you should be too. Here’s why:

  • Issue 55 is our Northern BC issue, where you’ll have a chance to experience some of the best fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and art from this unique and under-represented region of Canada.

  • We’ve got poetry by the likes of Gillian Wigmore, Derrick S. Denholme, Jeremy Stewart, and GP Lainsbury ranging from mathematical meditations on the logging industry to an exploration of PG (Prince George) social customs to a trip through the fractured yet transcendental thoughts of a homeless person.

  • If poetry’s not your bag, we’ve also got a story by Carly Stewart about an unenthusiastic stalker, and an absolutely beautiful graphic narrative by Kara Sievewright that weaves together the intricate story of the city of Prince Rupert’s violent history.

  • Our non-fiction section for Issue 55 is chock full of interesting interviews with the likes of literary pioneer Barry McKinnon, as well as some creative essays by Sarah de Leeuw on small town film fests, lightning, and dogs lost to the cold and wild.

  • This issue features a bold and exciting new redesign by the extremely talented Natalie Olson, who you may know from some of her recent book cover designs.

All in all this promises to be an amazing issue of the magazine, and I encourage you to pick up a copy or a subscription at our online store anytime after February 8th.

Filed under filling Station experimental literature Can Lit canadian lit Northern BC poetry fiction non-fiction

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Hey ya’ll, We here at filling Station have just launched our annual Holiday Sale! All through the month of December, get 3-Issue Subscriptions for just $15 and 6-Issue Subscriptions for just $25. Also, with the purchase of your own subscription, you get the option of purchasing up to 5 Gift Subscriptions for $10 each - perfect for the literature lovers on your list. Check it out at: http://fillingstation.ca/subscribe

Hey ya’ll,
We here at filling Station have just launched our annual Holiday Sale! All through the month of December, get 3-Issue Subscriptions for just $15 and 6-Issue Subscriptions for just $25. Also, with the purchase of your own subscription, you get the option of purchasing up to 5 Gift Subscriptions for $10 each - perfect for the literature lovers on your list. Check it out at: http://fillingstation.ca/
subscribe

Filed under magazine literature filling Station fiction poetry lit nonfiction reviews art canadian lit

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Hey ya’ll,The new issue of filling Station is out now! Issue 54 is jam-packed full of experimental poetry, fiction, nonfiction and art by the likes of Nathaniel G. Moore, Eric Zboya, derek beaulieu, Elodie Olson-Coons, Rod-Moody Corbett, and Lisa Brawn. So why not order a copy online at: http://fillingstation.myshopify.com/or maybe pick up a 3-issue subscription for $20 or 6-issues for $36?I’ll love you forever!

Hey ya’ll,
The new issue of filling Station is out now! Issue 54 is jam-packed full of experimental poetry, fiction, nonfiction and art by the likes of Nathaniel G. Moore, Eric Zboya, derek beaulieu, Elodie Olson-Coons, Rod-Moody Corbett, and Lisa Brawn.
So why not order a copy online at: http://fillingstation.myshopify.com/
or maybe pick up a 3-issue subscription for $20 or 6-issues for $36?
I’ll love you forever!

Filed under filling station lit books magazine experimental literature poetry fiction nonfiction art